Wilbur Ross
 
 
 
 
Secretary of Commerce
Wilbur Ross

Wilbur Louis Ross, Jr. (born November 28, 1937) is an American investor, and former banker, known for restructuring failed companies in industries such as steel, coal, telecommunications, foreign investment and textiles. He specializes in leveraged buyouts and distressed businesses. As of August 2014, Forbes magazine lists Ross as one of the world's billionaires with a net worth of $2.9 billion. On November 24, 2016, it was reported by the Associated Press that Ross will be picked for Secretary of Commerce by the incoming Trump Administration. The Trump transition team confirmed the President-elect's intent to nominate him on November 30, 2016.
Wilbur Ross Facts
  • Following the Sago Mine disaster, the New York Post's Roddy Boyd reported that Ross "had been intimately involved with the company that owned the West Virginia mine where 12 miners perished and he knew all about its safety problems, former executives charged."
  • The article also reported that the mine had 12 roof collapses in 2005, and that the U.S. Department of Labor data showed 208 citations for safety violations in that same period, including 21 times for build-up of toxic gasses. Despite these figures, Ross refused to shut down the mine. The Department of Labor and the State of West Virginia, as well as Congress are currently investigating the disaster.
Opinion

Because of the facts connected to the Sago Mine Disaster, Wilbur gets a BAD EGG AWARD.
Secretary of Commerce

The United States Secretary of Commerce is the head of the United States Department of Commerce. The Secretary is appointed by the President of the United States with the advice and consent of the United States Senate and serves at the President's pleasure. A member of the President's Cabinet, the Secretary is concerned with promoting American businesses and industries; the Department states its mission to be "to foster, promote, and develop the foreign and domestic commerce". Until 1913 there was one Secretary of Commerce and Labor, uniting this department with the Department of Labor, which is now headed by a separate Secretary of Labor.
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